Cane Corso In Apartment? — Get The Lowdown Here!

Updated Jan 11, 2022

Cane Corso Apartment

Many people wonder whether a Cane Corso is a good apartment dog. Given that the Cane Corso is a working dog, bred to hunt and guard livestock, it is not the most obvious choice for an apartment dweller. But with a little care and preparation, a Cane Corso can make a great apartment pet.

Is A Cane Corso A Good Apartment Dog? Yes, a Cane Corso can be a good apartment dog as long as you are willing to put in the effort to train and prepare your dog properly. They do well in apartments as long as they are put into obedience training, socialized with other pets early on, and provided with enough exercise.

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In this article, we will take a look at some of the things you need to consider before bringing a Cane Corso into your apartment. We’ll further look into whether apartment policies favor such an arrangement and if your dog would be comfortable staying in an apartment. Finally, we’ll provide you with tips on how to train your Cane Corso to do well in an apartment.

All in all, whether a Cane Corso is a good apartment dog depends on the individual dog and his or her owner's ability to provide proper care and exercise. If you think you can handle the challenges of owning a Cane Corso, and your building allows them, then go for it.

Be sure to obedience-train your dog, socialize him, and provide sufficient exercise for his needs, and you can have a happy and well-adjusted Cane Corso living in your apartment.

Do Apartments Allow Cane Corso?

Cane Corsos are not a common breed of dog to find in apartment buildings, for a number of reasons. If you have a Cane Corso and are looking for an apartment to rent, you will need to call the management of the complex and ask if they allow this breed of dog.

Some complexes may have weight or size restrictions that could exclude Cane Corsos from living there, while others may allow them as long as they are obedience trained. Some apartment buildings may have a list of restricted breeds which could include Cane Corsos.

Much like the decision of whether or not to bring a dog into your life, you should thoroughly consider the pros and cons of keeping a Cane Corso in an apartment before taking one home. They can make great additions to your home. As always, it is important to do your research before bringing any pet into your life.

Pros And Cons Of Cane Corsos In Apartments

Some of the pros for allowing a Cane Corso to live in an apartment are that this dog is protective of its family and home, making it a deterrent for burglars or other would-be intruders.

Corsos are also excellent guard dogs and are known to be very loyal to their owners, which can be a big benefit in city living.

As long as your Cane Corso is obedience trained and knows not to bark excessively, he can make a great addition to your apartment.

One plus point — you can walk to the ATM without any worry that anybody is going to try anything!

On the other hand, living in an apartment with a Cane Corso also has its share of downsides. This breed of dog is generally thought to be very active, with high exercise requirements. The reality is that Cane Corsos are more likely to be medium-energy, and they will adapt to whatever walking/exercise regime you are able to provide.

Ours are very happy to lay around. They often lay around all day and don’t always exhibit much enthusiasm at the prospect of going out. They don’t always feel like it! Just like we humans don’t always feel like tearing around. They all gather round every evening to watch a film.

For me, the high-energy Cane Corso is a myth. Not to say that other people don’t have high-energy Cane Corsos — I’m sure they do. I’m just saying that the widely-spread idea of the Cane Corso being always high-energy is not correct.

But individual dogs will vary in this matter, with some being real layabouts and others needing more energy. The potential problem to avoid would be if your Cane Corso actually is a dog with high energy and needs a lot of activity. If this was the case, and you are not able to provide enough exercise, he may become restless and destructive.

Mastiffs in general are known to be drooly and slobbery dogs, which can lead to messes in your apartment. But Cane Corsos actually drool the least out of all the mastiffs.

One of our two Cane Corsos does not drool at all. The other does not drool in the normal sense, but does drip some water when drinking. As with everything, there will be differences with drooling in individual dogs.

Can Cane Corsos Be Left Alone?

Corsos can be very vocal dogs and may bark excessively when left alone or when they become agitated. If you work long hours and cannot be home to attend to your Cane Corso, then this may not be the best breed for you.

Leaving a Cane Corso alone for extended periods can result in your dog becoming bored, lonely, and anxious. Some of these issues can be mitigated with training and exercise, and it is possible to leave a Cane Corso home alone, but you need to be sure your dog knows basic commands and understands how to behave when you are not there.

Leaving your Cane Corso alone all day is probably asking too much. If you can’t get back at all during the day you really need to either arrange a dog sitter, or dog walker, or even put him in doggy daycare.

Is Cane Corso Good For First Time Owners?

A Cane Corso is not generally recommended for someone who has never owned a dog before. The main reason is that the breed has a strong protective instinct which needs to be under control.

I think the general concern is that a first-time owner may not take the need for training seriously enough. An early start in training is recommended for the Cane Corso breed.

In fact, the Cane Corso is not at all difficult to train. He is naturally very loyal to his owner, and very keen to please. In conjunction with being an intelligent dog, this makes it easy to train him — he quickly picks up your requirements, follows your lead, and retains his training. Cane Corsos respond well to positive reinforcement techniques.

So, if a first-time owner takes these responsibilities seriously, there is no reason not to have a Cane Corso as a first dog.

We have a full article on this here:
Cane Corso For First Time Owner

Will My Cane Corso Protect Me?

Yes, a well-trained Cane Corso will most likely protect you. They are known to be very loyal and protective of their owners. They are likely to deter, rather than attack, putting themselves between you and any danger.

This breed has a strong instinct to guard and defend its owner and owner's property, so your dog must know when he or she is allowed to be protective toward others and when it is not.

Are Cane Corsos Good City Dogs?

A Cane Corso can be a great city dog. You can walk your dog on leash and, usually there will be a park to provide an alternative environment. Your Cane Corso should definitely always be on-leash and it may be necessary for him to wear a muzzle.

On the downside, a Cane Corso is a very imposing dog and his size and muscularity can be intimidating to others. Cane Corso can be wrongly associated with PitBulls. When they have their ears cropped, they can look like huge Pitbulls.

Don’t be surprised if people cross the street when they see your Cane Corso approaching. It’s common for people to have completely the wrong idea about your Cane Corso.

Cane Corsos look much less dangerous if the ears are not cropped. You’ll have an easier time walking a Cane Corso in the city if he does not have cropped ears.

Medical authorities have confirmed that there is no medical benefit or reason to do this. It’s my belief that it’s much kinder not to put your dog through that procedure, and there are benefits for you both in not doing so.

Can A Cane Corso Live Comfortably In An Apartment?

Yes, a Cane Corso can live comfortably in an apartment as long as he or she receives enough exercise and care. This breed should not be confined to a small space for extended periods. It is important to provide plenty of positive reinforcement when he or she behaves well in the apartment.

Do Cane Corsos Bark A Lot?

Yes, a Cane Corso will bark when left alone, if he is agitated, and when somebody approaches its property. This can be a nuisance if your dog barks excessively at random times throughout the day. They also bark as a protective measure, if they feel threatened or see somebody as an intruder.

Corsos can be very vocal dogs and may bark excessively if left alone or when they become agitated. Our Cane Corsos are very protective and bark when people or cars pass by, and even when birds invade our airspace.

But we live in a very isolated location, and it is only infrequently that there is something to disturb them. If they were in a busier, noisier environment with more people coming and going, I’m sure they would have adapted to that.

Tips For Apartment Training Your Cane Corso

If you can provide your Cane Corso with plenty of exercise, obedience training, and socialization, then he can be a great addition to your apartment. Here are some tips for apartment training your Cane Corso:

Make sure your dog gets some exercise each day, according to your schedule. A tired dog is less likely to be destructive.
Start obedience training early and be consistent. Make sure you are the pack leader.
Keep your dog's routine consistent and avoid long periods of separation. If you need to leave, then arrange for somebody to come over and take care of your Cane Corso during the day.

Can You Puppy Proof Your Apartment For A Cane Corso?

Yes, you can puppy-proof your apartment for a Cane Corso. Some tips include:

Putting electrical cords and poisonous plants out of reach
Closing off any spaces that your dog could crawl into, such as under furniture or into cabinets
Putting away any food or objects that your dog could chew on or swallow
Keeping your trash can lid on tight
Putting a gate at the top and bottom of your stairs if you have them

Other Considerations For Cane Corsos In Apartments

Take care in situations where your Cane Corso is meeting other people or other dogs for the first time. The confined spaces of apartment lobbies and corridors are not ideal for this.

If there is an elevator in your apartment building, don’t use it when you are with your dog. Take the stairs. It doesn’t matter how well-trained your Cane Corso is, if someone else’s dog isn’t…

One person I know took their well-trained dog in a lift and a second person with a dog entered on another floor. The new entrant was aggressive, and attacked. A dog fight in such a confined space is a nightmare and our friend ended up in hospital with a badly cut hand.

Ask Your Breeder

If you are just starting out in considering or finding a Cane Corso for your apartment, your breeder will be your best friend. Ask him or her about all the main areas of concern.

Enlist his help in finding/selecting a puppy with all the right attributes to begin with. For your apartment, you want a puppy that is in the middle of the range in terms of energy level, alpha tendencies, independence and stubborness. You breeder will know exactly which of his puppies tick your boxes.

Also, check the parents’ lips for drool factor. You can’t really tell if a puppy will become a drooly adult. But you can get a good clue from how droopy the lips of his parents are.

Summary

Cane Corsos are large, muscular dogs that may not be suitable for everyone. Before bringing one into your home, it is important to consider whether or not an apartment is the right environment for him.

If you can provide exercise and training for your Cane Corso, then he may be able to live comfortably in an apartment. Since Corsos are protective, it is important to socialize them at a young age so they learn to behave properly toward strangers.

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